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107 persons died by Okada accidents in two years – LASG

Okada-protest

Lagos State Government (LSG) on Thursday released Okada-related accidents data, in a subtle move to push back on the mounting criticism over the recent ban on Okada in Lagos metropolis.

According to its figures, no fewer than 619 people were either killed or seriously injured in commercial motorcycle accidents across the state in the last two years.

A statement by The Special Adviser to Lagos State Governor on Media, Mr. Hakeem Bello, explained that the figure was from the state Traffic Management Authority’s record.

He said  that  records from the Planning and Research Department of LASTMA showed that out of the number, 107 people died while 512 sustained serious injuries as a result of the accidents.

His words, “Details of the accidents between January 2011 and October 2012 further revealed that a total of 442 commercial motorcycles, popularly called okada, were involved in accidents across the state during the period out of which 271 occurred in 2011 while 171 occurred in 2012.

“Also according to the records, in 2011 alone, 47 were killed and 98 others sustained serious injuries while from January 2012 to date 63 people have been killed while 59 others sustained serious injuries.”

The government added that police records showed that a total of 513 fatal accidents recorded in the state in the last two years were caused by okada operators.

According to the record, out of this number 305 happened between January and December 2011 while 208 of the fatal accidents happened between January and June 2012.

“The record also revealed that of the 30 armed robbery incidents recorded in the state between the months of July and September this year, 22 of them involved the use of commercial motorcycles. Details, according to the record, show that of eight robberies that occurred in July, seven involved the use of okada while okada was also used in 10 out of 14 robberies in September and in five out of eight robberies in August,” the statement said.

It added that the state government promulgated the Lagos Road Traffic Law to address some of the security challenges by restricting operators of commercial motorcycles to certain areas in the metropolis among other reasons.

The statement said government only restricted okada operations to some areas to regulate traffic and  reduce avoidable accidents and loss of life on roads.”

  • Sylvester. udemezue

    If 103 persons lost their lives in okada-related accidents in two years, there are other relevant questions, which government needs to ask and answer. is this number higher than those who lost their lives in motor vehicle accidents in the state within the same period? So why not ban the use of motor vehicles because very many lives were lost in motor vehicle accidents? How many people died inside their own houses within the same period? So why not place a ban on people living in their houses because very many people suffered and died in one form or another in their houses? Also, why not place a permanent ban on air travel in Nigeria because plane crashes have claimed hundreds of lives in Nigeria within the past few years? The truth of this matter is that Government is not looking at the other side of the coin. If placing a ban on okada in Lagos will “drastically” reduce accidents and “crimes” in the state, what about the negative consequences of this ban? Or is government saying that okada riders have no usefulness at all in the state or that they make no contribution to Lagos economy and stability? Is not possible that this ban on okada might lead to escalation in criminal activities, armed robbery, and violence in the State? A ban on okada in Lagos at this time would throw no fewer than 600,000 persons into joblessness in Lagos, and about two million people into hopelessness. From the okada riders themselves to motocycle vendors, bike repairers, parts sellers, families and family members of all these people etc. And my worry is, how would our security agencies be able to contain the ugly consequences of the idleness of these once busy minds? The idle mind is the devil’s workshop, they say. Activities of okadamen needs to be regulated but any attempt at placing a ban on them now in Lagos, will only spell doom. Please, government, we are enjoying some level of peace in
    Lagos now. A ban on okada business might dislocate the peace, security and stability of th state. Even if some of these okadamen are criminals, allowing them to operate will keep them busy, and lessen crime. If an okada man is busy, running around throughout the day, I doubt if he would have the strength and time to plan and execute crime in the night. Besides, if I may ask, is government saying to all the criminals in this state are okada riders or that all criminal activities in the state are perpetuated by only okada riders? Or that a ban on okada business will stamp out crime? I think the reverse might be the case.

  • Sylvester. udemezue

    If 107 persons lost their lives in okada-related accidents in two years, there are other relevant questions, which government needs to ask and answer. is this number higher than those who lost their lives in motor vehicle accidents in the state within the same period? So why not ban the use of motor vehicles because very many lives were lost in motor vehicle accidents? How many people died inside their own houses within the same period? So why not place a ban on people living in their houses because very many people suffered and died in one form or another in their houses? Also, why not place a permanent ban on air travel in Nigeria because plane crashes have claimed hundreds of lives in Nigeria within the past few years? The truth of this matter is that Government is not looking at the other side of the coin. If placing a ban on okada in Lagos will “drastically” reduce accidents and “crimes” in the state, what about the negative consequences of this ban? Or is government saying that okada riders have no usefulness at all in the state or that they make no contribution to Lagos economy and stability? Is it not possible that this ban on okada might lead to escalation in criminal activities, armed robbery, and violence in the State? A ban on okada in Lagos at this time would throw no fewer than 600,000 persons into joblessness in Lagos, and about two million people into hopelessness. From the okada riders themselves to motocycle vendors, bike repairers, parts sellers, families and family members of all these people etc. And my worry is, how would our security agencies be able to contain the ugly consequences of the idleness of these once busy minds? The idle mind is the devil’s workshop, they say. Activities of okadamen need to be regulated but any attempt at placing a ban on them now in Lagos, will only spell doom for the state and it’s residents. Please, government, we are enjoying some level of peace in Lagos now. A ban on okada business might dislocate the relative peace, security and stability the state currently enjoys. Even if some of these okadamen are criminals, allowing them to operate their okada business will keep them busy, and thereby lessen crime. If an okada man is busy, running around throughout the day, I doubt if he would have the strength and time to plan and execute crime in the night. Besides, if I may ask, is government saying to all the criminals in this state are okada riders or that all criminal activities in the state are perpetuated by only okada riders? Or that a ban on okada business will stamp out crime? I think the reverse might be the case.